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The Enterprise Award: Kimberly D. Chaffin

The Enterprise Award: Kimberly D. Chaffin, a graduate of the Tulsa University School of Law, is president of the Springfield land title company that her father started in 1959. It remains family owned-and-operated today; her brother and husband serve as its vice presidents. Chaffin’s sister, Crista Hogan, is the executive director of the Springfield Metropolitan Bar Association and a member of this year’s Women’s Justice Awards selection committee.

Kimberly D. Chaffin, a graduate of the Tulsa University School of Law, is president of the Springfield land title company that her father started in 1959. It remains family owned-and-operated today; her brother and husband serve as its vice presidents. Chaffin’s sister, Crista Hogan, is the executive director of the Springfield Metropolitan Bar Association and a member of this year’s Women’s Justice Awards selection committee.

What are some of your proudest career accomplishments?  Hogan Land Title celebrated its 50th anniversary this year. That of course was not my accomplishment alone, but I felt so proud to be a part of that legacy.

 

What inspired you to get involved in the justice system? My father, Jack Hogan, quietly and consistently suggested I give law school a try. As a business owner he understood how valuable a law degree could be.

 

What has been your favorite part of the job? I have two favorites. One is when the company is running full throttle and you can feel a sort of hum in the office, everyone working together. My other favorite is helping clients who might feel intimidated by a traditional law office feel comfortable and at ease — I get lots of hugs from my clients!

 

What is something that would surprise people about you? Because my approach is understated, I have lots of people surprised that I am an attorney!

 

What is the best advice you’ve ever given or received? Keep it all in perspective.

 

When you were growing up, what did you want to be? I was quite sure I wanted to be a veterinarian, from childhood until I was a junior at Drury University. After actually working with a couple of vets, I decided that might not be the way to go for me.

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